Tag Archives: Yonder Mountain String Band

The 41st Huck Finn Jubilee returns to Southern California

The 41st Huck Finn Jubilee
Huck Finn Jubilee
October 5-7, 2018
Cucamonga-Guasti Regional Park
Ontario, California
Photographer: Allen Erwin Continue reading The 41st Huck Finn Jubilee returns to Southern California

19th Annual Summer Camp

Summer Camp 2018
19th Annual Summer Camp
Chillicothe, IL
Photographer/Writer: Tyler Muir

The unofficial kick off to summer is Summer Camp Music Festival. After it’s 19th year Summer Camp has solidified its name as the premier festival in the Midwest and continues to grow. Having ten stages with music being played on them nearly twenty hours a day, Summer Camp has become a music festival buffet that has something for everyone. Who says you have to be a kid to go to camp?

The unofficial camp counselors of Summer Camp are the boys from Umphrey’s McGee. From stage time to organizing the festival’s kickball game, the band has earned all possible camp badges at this point. Their Friday night set showed why the band has come to the forefront of jam scene. Starting off with, “Maybe Someday” they let everyone know they are not afraid of heights. “All in Time” seemed to have a little extra magic sprinkled on it sounding like an anthem being played across the festival grounds. “Booth Love” had support from Ryan Zoldis and Eric “Benny” Bloom of Lettuce with all the juices flowing everyone ended set one in fourth gear with “Call to Arms”, from the infamous Sturgill Simpson.

Continue reading 19th Annual Summer Camp

Yonder Mountain String Band at the Variety Playhouse

Yonder Mountain String Band
Friday, February 6, 2015
Variety Playhouse
Atlanta, GA
Photographer: Brad Kuntz

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Kinfolk Celebration 2014

Kinfolk Celebration 2014   kinfolk2014_4.25x6_NEW_zoo   Our friends in the Yonder Mountain String Band are throwing one hell of a party at Planet Bluegrass in a couple of weeks!  With the bands regular special guests Jake Joliff and the fiery Allie Kral already making mad sparks with Adam, Ben and Dave they’re joined by super stars like John Bell of Widespread Panic, Ronnie McCoury and Jason Carter of the Travelin’ McCourys, Drew Emmitt and even the Patron Saint of Festivals Vince Herman. A once in a life time set of music and mayhem is on it’s way!  With full sets by The Travelin’ McCourys, Head For The Hills and the up and coming Gipsy Moon the fun will run till the wee hours of the night.  Tickets and information available HERE     Kinfolk Poster

Yonder Mountain String Band: The Show Must Go On

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Yonder Mountain String Band

w/ The Travelin’ McCourys

February 15, 2014

The Orpheum Theatre

Madison, WI

 

 

 

In late January, Yonder Mountain String Band mandolinist Jeff Austin had a baby girl. The band is very excited for him – of course! – but as they say: the show must go on. So Yonder announced a tour with opening act, the Travelin’ McCourys. Not a bad get for an opener. Throughout the 17 dates they have been doing together without Austin, Ronnie McCoury has been filling in on mandolin. And in case that wasn’t enough, Jason Carter has been adding his world-renowned fiddle skills to the mix.

 

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The Orpheum Theatre, Madison’s most iconic, has a nearly 100-year history. In recent years, it has faced fires and foreclosure, but on February 15th, the line to enter stretched around the block.

 

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The Travelin’ McCourys took the stage promptly at eight and came out scorching. They kicked off their set with Ronnie singing lead on “Why Did You Wander,” and “Thanks A Lot.” They then turned the mic over to Carter, who stepped up and sang “What a Waste,” a song imploring the listener not to waste any of their precious corn liquor.

 

 

Then it was five-string master Robbie McCoury’s turn and the band stepped back from the mics and let their instruments do the talking. Robbie brought the song in and threw it over to their guitarist for the tour, Cody Kilby, and he just threw it right back. Kilby plays guitar full time with Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder, but he has been lending his immense talents to this tour.  He is an immensely talented multi-instrumentalist who gives whole new meaning to flatpicking. While he can run fiddle tunes with the best of them, he doesn’t limit himself to tradition. Utilizing chords that would be more expected from Wes Montgomery than Lester Flatt, he tore through changes with a flair not often seen in a IMG_2562traditional bluegrass set. Not to be outdone, Robbie put down his five-string banjo and picked up an electric, replete with fuzz and distortion, and tore into it. After the song, Ronnie joked that we had just been listening to Robbie’s “5-String Flame Thrower.”  A well-deserved moniker.

 

Bassist Alan Bartram crooned, “Messed Up Just Right,” the love song he wrote about taking his wife out on the town. Ronnie gave us a few more with his high lonesome sound, including Bill Monroe’s “Body and Soul.” Then Carter let his country gold voice shine on Doc Watson’s “Southbound” and Alan led the boys through Tony Rice’s “Old Train.” They finished out the set with Dylan’s “Walk Out in the Rain.” With promises that Ronnie and Jason would be right back, they thanked the packed crowd and exited stage right.

 

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Yonder took the stage and bassist Ben Kaufman immediately stepped up to the mic to talk about how much he loved Madison. The band then lit into “I Know You Rider.”  With sly smile banjoist Dave Johnston then asked if we would all be his valentine and took us through “Ripcord Blues.”  Moving through the band, guitarist Adam Aijala led “All the Time” and then Kaufman sang “New Deal Train,” which he referred to as his protest song. Aijala added his harmonica chops to the track, contributing to its depression-era flavor. The song ended, and without giving the crowd a moment to reflect, Kaufman set up a deep and jazzy bass lead-in to “Freeborn Man,” sung by Ronnie.

 

IMG_2634Then the band called out Robbie and Kilby of the Travelin’ McCourys, as well as their friend Darren Shumaker, who brought another mandolin into the mix. On stage there was one bass, one fiddle, two banjos, two guitars, two mandolin players and a whole lot of bluegrass power.

 

Kaufman asked anyone on the stage without a Grammy to please raise their hands. Quite a few remained on their instruments. The McCourys are fresh off a Grammy win (with father and bandleader Del McCoury) for Bluegrass Album of the Year. Kilby is also a Grammy-winning musician. While losing a key member of your band, even for a few weeks, is never ideal it always helps when you have world class, Grammy-winning musicians ready to step in and help you power through. The eight of them plowed through “Pass This Way.” Trading solos and feeding off of each other, the set closer went on for close to half an hour.

 

It had been two great sets of music and “Pass This Way” could easily have served as a great end to a great show. But Kaufman let us know that they were going to take a quick break and then, he promised, there would be more of the same and lots of it!

 

IMG_2635And he meant it. The next set lasted over two hours. It opened with “My Gal” into “No Expectations.” They did “Landfall,” a new Aijala tune and then invited up Bartram, one of Kaufman’s “favorite people” to share bass duties on “Black Sheep.”

 

Perhaps inspired by Robbie’s 5-string flame thrower earlier in the night, Aijala kicked on his distortion pedal and led the band through a very short, but very powerful, punk rock number. The whole thing was about a minute long, but showed a different side to the band’s talents.

 

Their punk rock moment turned out to be just an appetizer for a set that was about to jump very outside the bluegrass box. They ripped into a prog-rock tinged “Dogs,” by Pink Floyd. The song ebbed and flowed, it turned and shook without warning, it descended into darkness, only to be brought back with a guitar riff or a mandolin run.

 

The band re-entered the box – briefly – as Johnston sang the more traditional “Going to the Races.” Then they called their friends back out and the eight-headed bluegrass machine deconstructed Todd Snyder’s “Sideshow Blues,” in ways that Mr. Snyder probably couldn’t have imagined, but surely would have loved.

 

IMG_2548“Dogs” and “Sideshow” were each close to a half an hour. It almost seemed hard to imagine an encore could follow. Rather than try to outdo themselves, they took us to a quieter, more introspective place with “Reuben and Cherise.”

 

Kaufman thanked the crowd for braving the weather – it’s February in Wisconsin! He recognized that while the single-digit temperature might not slow this audience down, he admitted that it was a lot for the bands to handle. Perhaps it was this reluctance that earned the crowd one final song for the night: “Let Me Fall.”

 

Follow Josh Klemons on twitter @jlemonsk

Strings & Sol 2013: All About The Music

Strings & Sol When writing reviews you are always advised to not write in the first person as you are supposed to be objective and not let personal feelings interfere with the critique of the event, album, or music at hand. But sometimes the best way to truly express how special something was is through your own personal feelings. Strings & Sol 2013 was one of those events.

The past decade has seen an explosion in the number of music related festivals; seemingly every plot of land with the room to throw up a stage and let people camp has hosted a festival at some point in the past ten years. The new hot-trend lately has been the advent of the destination festival.  Group a couple of like-minded bands together and find some exotic location at a resort that is willing to host a horde of music fans looking to get away from the cold-weather of the winter months and boogie their butts off on the beach.  Then give it some kind of nifty play-on words name like Mayan Holidaze, Strings & Sol, or One Big Holiday – and viola you have a destination festival.  Now with that being said, one would be a fool to think that is all that it takes to start one of these festivals. The logistics and planning that goes into an event like Strings & Sols must be staggering.  And to pull it off as flawlessly as the folks at Strings & Sol did is even that much more impressive.  But it is not simply great planning, cool locations, and good weather that make people drop $1000s and head out of the country for a week.  There has to be something more.

DSCN2539editedIt would be easy to sum up how amazing an experience Strings & Sol 2013 was in a few sentences.  It was in Mexico.  The resort was unbelievable. The stage was set-up on the beach which allowed bare-foot dancing in the white sand while the waves gently rolled in next to you.  Leftover Salmon, as did the other four bands that were present – Yonder Mountain String Band, Railroad Earth, Greensky Bluegrass, and Keller Williams & the Traveling McCourys – killed it all weekend with help from Little Feat’s Billy Payne who was a surprise guest for the festival.  But that would not do justice to the personal experience it was.  For people to make such a trip there is something more that draws people.

My wife and I got married a few months back.  Strings & Sol ended up being a belated honeymoon for us. One our favorite songs is Yonder Mountain String Band’s “Midwest Gospel Radio.”  It is a beautiful piece of music that meant so much to us we used it extensively at our wedding.  It is a song that no matter when we hear it brings goose-bumps and the memory of the wedding rushing back. Needless to say it is a bit special to us.  On the flight down from our home in Baltimore to Mexico my wife asked me if she thought Yonder might play “Midwest Gospel Radio,” at some point. With the confidence of the set list coinsurer that I think I am, I answered, “I don’t know, they don’t play it that much so I would not count on it.”  Friday afternoon during Yonder’s sunset show, I had left to grab a couple of drinks by the pool bar.  I know what you are thinking, “Why would you leave?”  In my defense the pool was mere steps away from the beach, you could still hear the music from the stage, and I couldn’t find a waiter on the beach (yes, there were waiters on the beach delivering drinks during the music.  I know how awesome).  As I waited for my cerveza and wife’s DSCN2677editedmudslide, I heard the first few simple gorgeous notes of “Midwest Gospel Radio.”  I grabbed my drinks and sprinted back towards the beach not wanting to miss this moment.  With drinks in hand I hurdled the small set of bushes between the pool and the walkway to the beach. I shimmed my way through the crowd and made it to my wife whose smile was lighting up the whole beach.  She reminded me of my doubt in hearing this song, and then added “this just made my trip.”  The addition of Billy Payne on keys and Railroad Earth’s Andy Goessling on saxophone only served to bring the song to life that much more.  And it was in that moment, as we stood there with goose-bumps on arms, that the real reason that people travel such lengths to go to events like this; the music.  It is the music and the deep connections we build with the bands and songs.  It is the power to hear a song and be instantly transported back to some living changing event. It is ability to have every memory you have flood back through the simple sound of a couple of chords.

DSCN2292editedIt would probably be safe to say that not everyone on the beach during “Midwest Gospel Radio” had the same reaction as us.  But it can probably be said that all who attended Strings & Sol found their own personal moment of music that reminded them why they came all this way to see some bands play some tunes.  And at Strings & Sol this year there were plenty of them.  It might have been getting to hear Leftover Salmon blast through a couple of Little Feat tunes, in “Fat Man in the Bathtub” and “Dixie Chicken,” as Billy Payne sat in with the band. It could have the appropriate festival opener of James Taylor’s “Mexico” by Greensky Bluegrass.  It could have been the way Keller Williams and the Traveling McCourys played through a raging rainstorm that cut short their set to then quickly move inside to the lobby bar and pick up exactly where they had left off in “Mullet Cut.”  Maybe it was the simpler things that stirred your soul like the playful afternoon session of Name That Tune Bingo at the pool with Keller Williams, Vince Herman, and his son Silas or the quiet intensity of the afternoon picking clinic with Ronnie McCoury and Railroad Earth’s Andy Goessling and John Skehan.  Maybe it was the way your favorite band seemed to be enjoying the music being played even more than you.  Looking over and catching Leftover Salmon’s Drew Emmitt grooving on the beach during Yonder Mountain String Band’s afternoon set.  Or seeing the guys from Greensky getting-down when every they were not on stageDSCN2184edited including a Mexican wrestling mask adorned Dave Bruzza holding court at the pool bar during the raging beauty of Railroad Earth’s transcendent headlining Friday night set that was a true highlight of the entire fest.  Over the four days of music there were limitless moments that stood out.  Some obvious for all to see, some like “Midwest Gospel Radio,” more personal and less obvious.  But regardless of what your highlight was, Strings & Sol provided plenty of them.

The beauty of live music is the unexpectedness of it. The twist and turns a familiar song can take live on stage that grow even more hair-raising when a band brings guests on stage and allow them to do their own unique thing.  Every festival seems to feature sit-ins, but at an event like Strings & Sol with the tightknit relationship’s that many of the band’s share when combined with the loose relaxed atmosphere lead to an abundance of guest appearances.  There was the ubiquitous presence of unannounced guest Billy Payne who lent his touch to every band through the weekend.  A surprise sit-in from Umphrey’s McGee’s Joel Cummins with Greensky Bluegrass during “Lose My Way” made it seem like anything was possible.  It was a common occurrence to look to the stage and see fiddler Jason Carter, Ronnie McCoury, and Greensky’s Anders Beck jumping onstage to provide a couple of tasty links to the DSCN2482editedproceedings.  There was the guest laden “Franklin’s Tower” during Leftover Salmon’s headlining set which included Billy Payne, Keller Williams, Ronnie McCoury, and Jason Carter which was a fifteen minute sensory overload.  While it seemed everyone got in on the sit-in vibe of the event, the true MVP of the sit-in’s was Railroad Earth’s fiddler Tim Carbone who seemingly never left the stage throughout the entire festival.  He was with Keller and the McCourys as they blasted through John Hartford’s “Vamp in the Middle,” just as he was onstage through most of Leftover Salmon’s shows.  He also joined Yonder for a number of songs during their three shows including a healthy “Traffic Jam” > “Rag Doll” > “Traffic Jam.”  He was even there late-night at the lobby bar as an impromptu picking-session sprang up with band mate Skehan and some of the contestants from the picking contest held early that day.

Regardless of what your moment was, you were sure to find one.  And when you did, and you got those goose-bumps and youDSCN2604edited danced with your feet in the ocean and your smile lit up the beach you knew why you had come.  It was not for the sun-kissed pool, or the all you could eat food, or all inclusive bar.  No, it was none of that, it was quite simply for The music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delfest: Hot Pickin’, Cold Temps, & McCourys Galore

DelfestSo heading in to Delfest this year there were two questions on everyone’s mind.  First what would the weather bring?  Would it be the Del Hail from 2009, wet and muddy conditions, or the blazing heat that seems to roll it to Delfest every year? It was none of the above as this year brought something never seen before at Delfest, un-seasonably cold weather.  While it was possibly the driest Delfest has ever been, a brief rainstorm late Thursday afternoon, and a few sprinkles that same night during Leftover Salmon’s set being the only precipitation seen all weekend it was the cold that will be remembered weather wise this year. The days were generally comfortable and mild, but as soon as the sun set behind mountains, the temperature dipped to near record lows every night, reaching into the low 40s, high 30s most nights. Fortunately the cold temperatures did nothing to stifle the hot-picking on stage at night.

 

The second question revolved around the inclusion of the Trey Anastasio Band as a headliner.  While there is no doubt of Anastasio’s love of bluegrass and there was palpable excitement leading up to the fest in anticipation about his set (actually two sets), there was some trepidation about the influence his addition might have on the family-friendly-easy-going nature that usually permeates Delfest crowds.  The phrase “Please Don’t Wook Delfest” was bandied about quite a bit before the weekend, TABbut it ended up being lot of worry over nothing.  There may have a been a slight increase in crowd size, but whether that was due to a natural growth in the size of the fest or because of Trey was really a moot point as the same easy-going-laid back atmosphere that is so pervasive every year at Delfest was evident again.  And since Anastasio’s set and appearance was so heavily discussed before the fest, it should be as equally discussed after. To sum up his set in as few words as possible, quite simply he killed it.

Anastasio’s two sets were fairly typical song selection wise for what he has been doing lately with his band.  He pulled from all of his various solo albums, though his set this evening was weighted heavily with songs from his self-titled release playing, “Cayman Review,” “Last Tube”, “Drifting”, “Push on till the day”, and “Money, Love, & Change,” this evening. He included the obligatory Phish songs that are a regular part of the Trey Band rotation, “First Tube,” “Gotta Jibboo,” “Sand”, and “Heavy Things.”  The “Heavy Things” encore was particularly nasty with the inclusion of Ronnie McCoury’s mind-blowing mandolin work and the tasteful addition of Jason Carter on fiddler.  The real highlight of the set was perhaps the worst kept secret of the weekend, the mid-2nd set sit-in of the Del McCoury Band.  Rumors had been circulated in the weeks prior of a collaboration between the two. Anastasio in his trademark rambling-story-telling-style explained how he had gotten a copy of a Del McCoury album from the guys in Aquarium Rescue Unit back in the early 90s and was hooked since then.  While onstage Del and Anastasio recounted their time playing together back at Phish’s Camp Oswego in 1999, before launching into a brief two song collaboration, “I’m Blue, I’m Lonesome” and “Beauty of My Dreams,” which was in the running for the most smile inducing song of the weekend.

 

_MG_9417As with every year at Delfest the McCoury family are perfect hosts, and Del and his two sons Ronnie and Rob seem to welcome almost every band to the festival by joining them onstage at some point.  Del seemed to sit-in a little less frequently than he has in years past, but in addition to his four main-stage sets, an afternoon Masters of Bluegrass set, and the annual McCoury Family Jam, he still found time to join the headliners, Leftover Salmon, Trey Anastasio, Old Crow Medicine Show, and Yonder Mountain String Band for a couple of tunes each night. He also took to the stage with dobro master Jerry Douglas, and walked on with Keller Williams and the McCoury’s to sing his verse in “Bumper Sticker.”  Younger brother and banjo picker Rob, while sitting in less than his Dad and brother, made the most of his limited guest spots, with his full set sit-in with the Rambling Rooks (Ronnie Bowman, Don Rigsby & Kenny Smith from the Lonesome River Band), a real Thursday treat.

 

Delfest The MVP of the McCoury family for the weekend and of the entire festival was hands down mandolinist Ronnie.  Already a busy man as it was with his four appearances with The Del McCoury Band, a set with Keller & the McCoury’s, a late night set opening for Leftover Salmon with the Traveling McCoury’s, and a Saturday afternoon inclusion as part of the special one-off All-Star band of Pikelny, Sutton, McCoury, Bulla, & Bales, Ronnie still found time and the energy to grace the stage with a variety of other bands countless times over the weekend.  His set with Pikelny, Sutton, McCoury, Bulla, and Bales was a nice surprise Saturday afternoon.  Assembled by banjo picker Noam Pikelny (Punch Brothers) and including guitarist Bryan Sutton (Hot Rize), fiddler Luke Bulla (Lyle Lovett Band), bassist Barry Bales (Allison Kraus & Union Station), and McCoury, the all-star collective blasted through a set through that pulled tunes from all of their vast repertoire’s.  The set was a picker’s dream, highlighting some of the best young musicians in the bluegrass world.  In addition to all his regularly scheduled sets, Ronnie was a ubiquitous present throughout the weekend, seemingly playing with every band that was at the festival.  The phrase, “And will you please welcome to the stage, Ronnie McCoury,” just seemed to be how bands introduced every one of their songs all weekend, as it would then be followed by Ronnie ambling on stage to rip through yet a mind-bending mandolin solo.  Listing all the bands who he sat in with would be akin to listing all the bands that were at Delfest. Late night, mid-day, main stage, music hall, it did not matter Ronnie was there.  He was not the only musician in Cumberland, it only seemed like it.

 

Del & Jerry McCoury

As usual the Delfest line-up was stocked with classic legendary bluegrass musicians as well as younger emerging stars.  One of the most anticipated sets of the weekend was the Masters of Bluegrass, or as Del called them, The Mob.  Comprised of Del on guitar and vocals, his brother Jerry McCoury on bass, JD Crowe on banjo, Bobby Osborne on mandolin, and Bobby Hicks on fiddle, The Mob is truly an once-in-a-lifetime line-up of living legends who can all trace their roots back to the earliest days of bluegrass.  They all joined Del on Saturday night for a brief main-stage appearance that was a showcase for their unparalleled talent.  But it was their Sunday afternoon set in the music hall then exemplified their true greatness. Playing without the constraints of time inside the spacious music hall. (Who is going to tell you to wrap it up when your name is the name of the festival?)  The five legends played a set that was a journey through the history of bluegrass with Del as your narrator.  They played without a set list taking requests from the crowd and each other.  The discovery of a previous band’s set list still taped to the stage lead to a humorous exchange within the band about what they should play next.

 

At the opposite end of the spectrum were those younger bands who are hoping to become the next legends of the genre.  At Delfest there were a trio of bands that all seemed to fit that description.  Two of them have stormed the jam-grass scene lately.  They both arrived on the scene a few years back in a swirl of high-energy picking and jams that finds them easily seguing from a classic Jimmy Martin tune, to a Grateful Dead song, to some random rock cover.  The Infamous Stringdusters and Greensky Bluegrass have both seen their respective audiences explode over the past few years, and their rise at Delfest has mirrored that same explosion.  They both started as early afternoon bands on the side stage their first years only to quickly find themselves main stage stalwarts and headliner late night acts.  This year they both played a pair of main stage sets, as well as each serving as a late-night headliner. And they did not disappoint during either set.  Unsurprisingly Ronnie McCoury made an appearance with both of them during their late night sets, joining Greensky for “Eat My Dust”, and the Infamous Stringdusters for a double shot of “Pioneers,” and “Wheel Horse.”

Infamous Stringdusters

The other band that seemed to garner so much attention over the weekend was Colorado’s Elephant Revival.  Elephant Revival is a five-piece band that mixes subtle strains of folk and bluegrass, with dreamy heart-felt lyrics that float along a river of gentle melody weaved by gypsy souls.  Every year at Delfest there is that band that seems to burst out of nowhere and Elephant Revival was that band this year.  Their two-sets on Friday, on the side-stage and in the music hall were both must attend moments of the festival. Their Behind the Music Artist Play Shop in the Music Hall was overflowing with people and provided a unique insight into the band and their music as they told stories about themselves and their music throughout the set.

 

As with years past at Delfest, one went into it worried about the weather and anxiously looking forward to the music.  And as _MG_9639with years past the weather threw a curve-ball that no one saw coming;  this year being the crazy cold temperatures.  But at the end of the weekend, as it always does, the weather became a distant thought when thinking back on the weekend. And whether you caught every appearance of Ronnie McCoury, or heard every glorious note that Del sung, or were worried if the world was going to end because Trey was there, in the end it did not matter because just as it is every year at Delfest not matter where you looked, whether on the main stage with the Masters of Bluegrass, in the music hall with Elephant Revival, on the side-stage during the band competition there was some hot picking happening and some incredible music being made, and as it does year after year, Delfest showed why it is one of the best festivals around.

 

 

Click the thumbnail(s) for more images from Delfest by Jordan August…

Click the thumbnail(s) for more images from Delfest by Tim Newby…

Strings & Sol 2013 Announced

 

strings & sol

After a hugely successful first year, Cloud 9 Adventures today announces the second installment of Strings & Sol, the newest music destination event in the Cloud 9 family, which also includes Mayan Holidaze, Jam Cruise, Holy Ship! and Panic en la Playa. Strings & Sol – set on the white sand beaches of Puerto Morelos on the Riviera Maya, Mexico – runs December 11 – 15, 2013. This unique adventure brings together some of today’s best progressive bluegrass bands for a rollicking string-music vacation like no other. Live performances during the event’s 4 days and nights include Yonder Mountain String Band (with three performances, one of which will be during sunset), Railroad Earth and Leftover Salmon (who will each have one closing show and one additional performance), Keller Williams with The Travelin’ McCourys, and Greensky Bluegrass (with two performances each).

 

Visit www.stringsandsol.com for more information.

Yonder Mountain String Band, 1/30/13

Yonder Mountain String Band
Ziggy’s
Winston-Salem, NC
January 30, 2013

Set 1: Sidewalk Stars -> Ain’t Been Myself In Years, Maid Of The Canyon, Near Me, Redbird, One More, Only A Northern Song, Things You’re Selling, Romance Blues, Blue Collar Blues, Angel -> Boatman

Set 2: Troubled Mind -> 20 Eyes -> Troubled Mind, Southbound, Winds Of Wyoming, Corona, My Gal -> Up On The Hill Where They Do The Boogie, Jail Song, Sometimes I’ve Won, Midwest Gospel Radio -> Ten -> Cuckoo’s Nest -> Ten

Encore: Walkin Shoes, Southern Flavor

Click on the thumbnail(s) to view photos from the show by Brad Kuntz…