Tag Archives: Tim Newby

Strings & Sol 2013: All About The Music

Strings & Sol When writing reviews you are always advised to not write in the first person as you are supposed to be objective and not let personal feelings interfere with the critique of the event, album, or music at hand. But sometimes the best way to truly express how special something was is through your own personal feelings. Strings & Sol 2013 was one of those events.

The past decade has seen an explosion in the number of music related festivals; seemingly every plot of land with the room to throw up a stage and let people camp has hosted a festival at some point in the past ten years. The new hot-trend lately has been the advent of the destination festival.  Group a couple of like-minded bands together and find some exotic location at a resort that is willing to host a horde of music fans looking to get away from the cold-weather of the winter months and boogie their butts off on the beach.  Then give it some kind of nifty play-on words name like Mayan Holidaze, Strings & Sol, or One Big Holiday – and viola you have a destination festival.  Now with that being said, one would be a fool to think that is all that it takes to start one of these festivals. The logistics and planning that goes into an event like Strings & Sols must be staggering.  And to pull it off as flawlessly as the folks at Strings & Sol did is even that much more impressive.  But it is not simply great planning, cool locations, and good weather that make people drop $1000s and head out of the country for a week.  There has to be something more.

DSCN2539editedIt would be easy to sum up how amazing an experience Strings & Sol 2013 was in a few sentences.  It was in Mexico.  The resort was unbelievable. The stage was set-up on the beach which allowed bare-foot dancing in the white sand while the waves gently rolled in next to you.  Leftover Salmon, as did the other four bands that were present – Yonder Mountain String Band, Railroad Earth, Greensky Bluegrass, and Keller Williams & the Traveling McCourys – killed it all weekend with help from Little Feat’s Billy Payne who was a surprise guest for the festival.  But that would not do justice to the personal experience it was.  For people to make such a trip there is something more that draws people.

My wife and I got married a few months back.  Strings & Sol ended up being a belated honeymoon for us. One our favorite songs is Yonder Mountain String Band’s “Midwest Gospel Radio.”  It is a beautiful piece of music that meant so much to us we used it extensively at our wedding.  It is a song that no matter when we hear it brings goose-bumps and the memory of the wedding rushing back. Needless to say it is a bit special to us.  On the flight down from our home in Baltimore to Mexico my wife asked me if she thought Yonder might play “Midwest Gospel Radio,” at some point. With the confidence of the set list coinsurer that I think I am, I answered, “I don’t know, they don’t play it that much so I would not count on it.”  Friday afternoon during Yonder’s sunset show, I had left to grab a couple of drinks by the pool bar.  I know what you are thinking, “Why would you leave?”  In my defense the pool was mere steps away from the beach, you could still hear the music from the stage, and I couldn’t find a waiter on the beach (yes, there were waiters on the beach delivering drinks during the music.  I know how awesome).  As I waited for my cerveza and wife’s DSCN2677editedmudslide, I heard the first few simple gorgeous notes of “Midwest Gospel Radio.”  I grabbed my drinks and sprinted back towards the beach not wanting to miss this moment.  With drinks in hand I hurdled the small set of bushes between the pool and the walkway to the beach. I shimmed my way through the crowd and made it to my wife whose smile was lighting up the whole beach.  She reminded me of my doubt in hearing this song, and then added “this just made my trip.”  The addition of Billy Payne on keys and Railroad Earth’s Andy Goessling on saxophone only served to bring the song to life that much more.  And it was in that moment, as we stood there with goose-bumps on arms, that the real reason that people travel such lengths to go to events like this; the music.  It is the music and the deep connections we build with the bands and songs.  It is the power to hear a song and be instantly transported back to some living changing event. It is ability to have every memory you have flood back through the simple sound of a couple of chords.

DSCN2292editedIt would probably be safe to say that not everyone on the beach during “Midwest Gospel Radio” had the same reaction as us.  But it can probably be said that all who attended Strings & Sol found their own personal moment of music that reminded them why they came all this way to see some bands play some tunes.  And at Strings & Sol this year there were plenty of them.  It might have been getting to hear Leftover Salmon blast through a couple of Little Feat tunes, in “Fat Man in the Bathtub” and “Dixie Chicken,” as Billy Payne sat in with the band. It could have the appropriate festival opener of James Taylor’s “Mexico” by Greensky Bluegrass.  It could have been the way Keller Williams and the Traveling McCourys played through a raging rainstorm that cut short their set to then quickly move inside to the lobby bar and pick up exactly where they had left off in “Mullet Cut.”  Maybe it was the simpler things that stirred your soul like the playful afternoon session of Name That Tune Bingo at the pool with Keller Williams, Vince Herman, and his son Silas or the quiet intensity of the afternoon picking clinic with Ronnie McCoury and Railroad Earth’s Andy Goessling and John Skehan.  Maybe it was the way your favorite band seemed to be enjoying the music being played even more than you.  Looking over and catching Leftover Salmon’s Drew Emmitt grooving on the beach during Yonder Mountain String Band’s afternoon set.  Or seeing the guys from Greensky getting-down when every they were not on stageDSCN2184edited including a Mexican wrestling mask adorned Dave Bruzza holding court at the pool bar during the raging beauty of Railroad Earth’s transcendent headlining Friday night set that was a true highlight of the entire fest.  Over the four days of music there were limitless moments that stood out.  Some obvious for all to see, some like “Midwest Gospel Radio,” more personal and less obvious.  But regardless of what your highlight was, Strings & Sol provided plenty of them.

The beauty of live music is the unexpectedness of it. The twist and turns a familiar song can take live on stage that grow even more hair-raising when a band brings guests on stage and allow them to do their own unique thing.  Every festival seems to feature sit-ins, but at an event like Strings & Sol with the tightknit relationship’s that many of the band’s share when combined with the loose relaxed atmosphere lead to an abundance of guest appearances.  There was the ubiquitous presence of unannounced guest Billy Payne who lent his touch to every band through the weekend.  A surprise sit-in from Umphrey’s McGee’s Joel Cummins with Greensky Bluegrass during “Lose My Way” made it seem like anything was possible.  It was a common occurrence to look to the stage and see fiddler Jason Carter, Ronnie McCoury, and Greensky’s Anders Beck jumping onstage to provide a couple of tasty links to the DSCN2482editedproceedings.  There was the guest laden “Franklin’s Tower” during Leftover Salmon’s headlining set which included Billy Payne, Keller Williams, Ronnie McCoury, and Jason Carter which was a fifteen minute sensory overload.  While it seemed everyone got in on the sit-in vibe of the event, the true MVP of the sit-in’s was Railroad Earth’s fiddler Tim Carbone who seemingly never left the stage throughout the entire festival.  He was with Keller and the McCourys as they blasted through John Hartford’s “Vamp in the Middle,” just as he was onstage through most of Leftover Salmon’s shows.  He also joined Yonder for a number of songs during their three shows including a healthy “Traffic Jam” > “Rag Doll” > “Traffic Jam.”  He was even there late-night at the lobby bar as an impromptu picking-session sprang up with band mate Skehan and some of the contestants from the picking contest held early that day.

Regardless of what your moment was, you were sure to find one.  And when you did, and you got those goose-bumps and youDSCN2604edited danced with your feet in the ocean and your smile lit up the beach you knew why you had come.  It was not for the sun-kissed pool, or the all you could eat food, or all inclusive bar.  No, it was none of that, it was quite simply for The music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Band’s Eye View 2013

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As 2013 comes to a close and year-end Best of Lists start popping up highlighting all the great music that was made this year, we at Honest Tune, wanted to find out what all those musicians who appear on all these best of lists were listening to this year.  So we asked some of our favorite bands what albums moved them this year and what were their memorable moments from a year full of great live shows.  Their answers provide a wide sampling of some of the great music that was made this year.  Some of it familiar, some of it not, but all of it well worth checking out.  Read on and hopefully discover some great, new music from 2013.

 

 

 

 

The four questions we asked each musician were:

1.) What were your 3 favorite albums of 2013?

2.) What was your favorite live moment of the year?

3.) What album or band were you most excited to discover in 2013?

4.) What are you looking forward to most in 2014?

 

 

DSCN8505editedKeller Williams

1.)  1. Bob Marley & The Wailers, Legend Remixed. Fresh spins on a universal music.

2. Pretty Lights, A Color Map of the Sun. It’s interesting how a DJ/producer will have humans play his ideas on instruments, record them on tape, press them to vinyl, then load it all in to the computer. That’s going above and beyond the call of duty.

3. White Denim’s, Corsicana Lemonade.  Super cool rock that rocks hard.

2.) Summer Camp in Chillicothe, Illinois.  Victor Wooten sat in with me the entire set.  It was tasty and the band was thrilled to be in the presence of the such musical greatness as Victor Wooten.  I  also enjoyed  the Bassnectar show at The Fillmore in Maryland.  I was dead center on the dance floor and my sternum was rattled. The energy went through the roof, it was powerful sh**t.

3.)  Breastfist, Tickly Shimmers. So funky. So complex. So funny. So weird. So good. Key track?  “Talk to the Fist”.

4.)  Looking forward to two huge bus tours with my new side project, More Than A Little.

(To hear more about Keller’s thoughts on Breastfist and his busy 2013, check out Honest Tune’s recent interview with him. Keller Williams with more than a little, its funky )

 

 

DSCN1473editedPaul Hoffman – Greensky Bluegrass

1.)  This is always tough.  I ask myself, “Did they have to be released in 2013 or did I just need to dig them in 2013?”

1.  Jason Isbell Southeastern.  Anders [Beck] said, “Listen to it and try not to love it.”  He was right.  This guy is freakin’ brilliant.

2.  Dawes Stories Don’t End.  I also think Taylor Goldsmith is a great writer.  If I dig the lyrics, I can latch on to a record in an unhealthy-listen-everyday kinda way.  I played this one a lot while we were flying this summer.

3.  Fruition Just One of Them Nights.  We just did 30+ shows with this band this fall.  I came home and listened to the album right away.  That’s got to say something.  Three amazing writers in this band.  Five incredible musicians.  Boy can they sing pretty too.

I did it.  All released in 2013.  I checked.

2.) In Chicago or Detroit I don’t know, we do so many shows in a row.” Checks calendar for a visual memory of the year, this is tough too.  I’m going with a recent memory.  It’s accessible and different.  I saw a lot of amazing music this year and (think) I played a great deal as well.  A piece that I will hold on to though is the emotion after our 9 week tour.  It’s sort of a sum-of-musical-moments. We worked so hard to keep it fresh every night and musically challenge ourselves and the listeners. The last show was hard but somehow we pulled it off.  I expected to be relieved (and certainly was) but I was struck with this nostalgia like never before.  I’ve already confronted this truth that there will never be another tour like that one.  I cried a little and it shocked me.  I was really surprised.  That’s a memory.

3.)  Jason Isbell.  The others above I was already familiar with.  Glad to be following him through future projects as well as looking back at his previous catalog. 

4.)   We’ve been working all year on a new album and it’s going to be released early in the year.  I’m anxious for people to hear it and there are some songs I’m excited to play.  Greensky is also going to play some amazing festivals in 2014.  I can’t say which but I can admit being stoked!

 

 

Mike DevolMike Devol – Greensky Bluegrass

1.)  1.  Jason Isbell, Southeastern. For someone who is generally so chipper, I’m a sucker for heartbreak. Not to say that it’s all sad- each song is just really poignant, and what Isbell says, he says really beautifully. I’m not yet incredibly familiar with his work with the Drive by Truckers, but this solo album is stripped down so charmingly, each arrangement in awesome service to its message. I listen to it almost every day.

2.  Frightened Rabbit, Pedestrian Verse. This Scottish band has released several albums, but their newest, Pedestrian Verse, is the one that has hooked me. It’s a study in texture, each band member contributing to a truly creative composite sound, that results in an album full of anthems. I find myself drumming on random objects and singing along at the top of my lungs.

3.  Lorde The Love Club EP. This is the prequel release to this fall’s super blockbuster pop sensation, Pure Heroine, which I also love. I know this is a jam publication- don’t judge me, but this 16-year old girl from New Zealand has created something pretty awesome in a world where Miley Cyrus and Toby Keith are the types to usually sell a ton of albums. She has a beautiful and unique voice, and the electronic accompaniment is just so damn sonically pleasing. Can’t stop listening.

2.)  Is it arrogant to choose a Greensky moment? Truth is, I play a hell of a lot more shows than I see, and I can’t think of any concert experience of this year that can hold a candle to the feeling I get when onstage with my boys. We finished a 47(?) show tour in mid-November with two sold-out nights at the Gothic Theater in Denver. That second night was some of the best fun I’ve had. We took the stage with a sense of victory that took us through that whole show, all relishing in the joy of playing, the pride of what we’d just accomplished, and the energy of perhaps our greatest fans of all.

3.)  Fruition. Didn’t discover them in 2013, but I’ll be damned if I didn’t discover just how awesome they are over the course of touring with them this year. If you haven’t heard of this 5-piece from Portland, OR, go buy all of their albums. When I first met Fruition, they had this charming string band sound, but with the addition of drums and the resulting growth in their songwriting styles, they’ve really come into an amazing, unique rock sound that is only theirs. I’m just getting started- They have three solid songwriters who can also sing stellar lead. Perhaps the most prolific of these is Jacob Anderson, who is also one of the best guitarists I know. Just plain shreds. Their three and sometimes four-part harmonies and vocal arrangements are some of the best in the business. And they’re just a bunch of solid, badass folks. Thankful that this year saw so many Greensky shows with Fruition as support. Next year, they’ll be too big to come out with us!

4.)  Sky’s the limit for 2014. First of all, I am just stoked for the release of our new album, If Sorrows Swim. We’ve been working on it all year, and I can’t wait to share it with our people, and hopefully some people who aren’t already “ours” in February or March. More great songs from Hoffman and Bruzza, self-produced and recorded with Glenn Brown in Michigan, like our last studio effort Handguns.

In true Greensky form, we’ll also be touring a lot. Festival season is already shaping up, and although I’m not allowed to talk about a lot of it yet, there is plenty to be excited about. What am I most excited about in 2014? The unknown. With all the exciting stuff that is happening for us, I’m gonna take the the optimist’s path and say that what I’m most excited about is all the cool stuff that isn’t planned yet. Who knows what the year will bring in terms of life and music-making experience, and I think that’s what keeps Greensky ticking in this often restless world of the touring musician- the people we meet, the scenes out the window of the bus, the crowds we play for, the spontaneous ontage pop-song teases. We have a lot of fun, and that’s what’s keeping us sane, and that’s what keeps us going from year to year. Come out and share in the revelry.

 

 

Patrick Rainey1Patrick Rainey – The Bridge, Freedom Enterprise

1.)  1.  Anders Osborne Peace – From the guy who brought us Three Free Amigos comes a full-length album that is brewed thick with soul and grit. Peace adds to a collection of songs that sticks with the listener like a heroin addiction. Anders’ guitar playing drips with good intention, but is over-driven to the point of dissonant overtones, yet somehow reaches the light at the end of the tunnel. This simple three piece band brings New Orleans Swamp to distortion levels, adding saxophone and the Hammond B3 along the way.

2. Lorde Pure Heroine – Intimate and fantastic, Pure Heroine is perfect for road trips and fornication. Consistent thumping bass lines and up-close vocals lend to a soothing and hypnotic experience. Nothing too complicated here, just good songs, perfectly executed with easy production. Albums like this usually make their way to my playlist because it’s clean and relaxing.

3.  Arcade Fire Reflektor – In contradiction to the previous two albums, Reflektor, has an uncanny abundance of density. The album itself has a live feel only because there is people clapping and cheering like there is a live audience, but the album ideally could not be more over-produced. This is one of the most expensive, collaborative, intense, and imaginative journeys one could expect out of listening to a bunch of invisible wave “sounds.”

2.)  David Byrne and St. Vincent (Baltimore, MD 6/13/13). – My buddy Cris Jacobs had won two tickets from WTMD the night of the show, and he asked me to go. I couldn’t be more excited because I really wanted to see David Bryne. I had never seen a show at the Myerhoff and it took my breath away from the moment I took my required seat. The band started, laying on the floor playing to the suspended honeycomb sound diffusing apparatus, that reflected the sound out to the mass of rather boisterous people. When David Byrne came out the crowd erupted, and I think I cried a little but I was soon brought back by his candor and personality. He said he had spent the day biking around Druid Hill Park, but it sounded more like “Droodle Pork” as he was demonstrating his best Bawlmer accent. He’s one of us, I thought. I soon realized that his counter part in the show, St. Vincent, was from another planet. She glided and pulsed so fluidly with the music, her presence was unmistakable, all while absolutely killing her vocal melodies and shredding a mean black shiny guitar. The accompanying marching horn section used every square foot of the stage and everyone played at least three instruments. Each song ended with a hard stop and the sound reverberated through the hall and through the bones of every person there. Acoustically perfect for that space, the band ended the show playing a few Talking Heads tunes, then laid back down on the hard symphony floor and played to that crazy ceiling.

3.)  Daft Punk – I was most excited for Random Access Memories because I remember jumping up and down on my futon listening to Discovery in my dorm room. This duo of robots produces the finest French disco in all the land. Throw a pile of synthesizers and vocoders at Pharrell and add a little Nile Rodgers and you got yourself a hit. Though after one listen, I did realize that I’m not in college anymore.

4.)  Next year I’m looking forward to playing lots of festivals with my new band Freedom Enterprise and this winter with The Bridge in Jamaica. 2013 has been a good year for music as the industry’s misfortunes have started to trimming out the grizzle. On behalf of all the musicians out there, I would like to thank the fans for their continued support. We’re the lucky ones.

 

 

Karl DensonKarl Denson – Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Greyboy All-Stars

1.)  1.  Justin Timberlake “20/20 Experience: I feel like this record kind of came out of nowhere. There is no real hip-hop being played on the radio anymore,  and the pop songs are monotone and terrible. I like the fact that a real R&B crooner record was able to make such a statement. I also like that all the songs are long.

2.  Fat Freddy’s Drop: I happened upon this record listening to public radio and I couldn’t take it off my playlist for a few months. Just a great sound, Nice mix of influences and A strangely familiar voice.

3.  Danger Mouse and Danielle Luppi “Rome”: just a beautiful album. The harmonies are way more interesting than I expected.

2.) Last Christmas I finally got to see Jack White live. ‘Nuff said.

 3.)   I can’t say a specific band. I discovered a lot of music this year. There’s a lot going on and a lot of things are changing.

4.)  This year I’m looking forward to making lots of music. The Tiny Universe has been going well and has a new album, New Ammo, dropping in February. I’m also taking my son to Costa Rica.

 

 

John Ginty 8x10John Ginty

1.)  1.  Amelita by Court Yard Hounds. Yes, I played on it, but it really is an amazing record. This is the second record from Emily and Martie of the Dixie Chicks, with Martin Strayer co-writing the songs and playing guitar. Great listen top to bottom, great traveling record.

2.  Made Up Mind by Tedeschi Trucks Band. They make GREAT records, that sound amazing thanks to Jim Scott, and have you seen them live?  Make that happen if you haven’t, one of the best shows I’ve ever seen. Old school.

3.  Shout! by Govt. Mule. Always a fan of the band and their records, this was a cool idea to do the second disc with special guests on vocals. My favorite treatment is “Funny Little Tragedy” with Elvis Costello.

2.)  Playing the first notes of “Not Ready to Make Nice” with the Dixie Chicks on the “Long Time Gone Tour” in Canada. The power of song is incredible. You could light up a city with that energy.

3.)  Samantha Fish. She rocks. She released her new record Black Wind Howlin’ on the same day my new record came out, and I started seeing her name all over the place. Really dig her playing, energy, and songwriting.

4.)  I’m looking forward to summer, honestly. Touring in this crappy cold weather is for the birds.

(Check out Honest Tune’s interview with John Ginty about his new album Bad News Travels.  John Ginty: They can’t take the organ away from me)

 

 

Chris Pandolfi1Chris Pandolfi – Infamous Stringdusters

1.) 1.  The BandLive at the Academy of Music 1971.  Everybody loves the Band, myself included. I was so excited when this came out, even though I’ve heard most of this stuff a million times before. But that’s the beauty of the Band–their music is the realest real deal, and it only gets better with time. Even though they are known for their songs/recordings, the live performance is magical. The horn arrangements at this show are so regal and perfect, the Dylan stuff is amazing, and the setlist is something to behold. Imagine having that many incredible songs? Thank God for the Band.

2.  Washed Out – Paracosm.  I discovered Washed Out’s Life of Leisure EP a few years back and it had a huge impact on me right away. His sound is beautiful–dreamy and heavily textured but totally accessible. He’s got great simple songs and a truly unique sound, something I really admire as an artist. His follow up to Life of Leisure (Within and Without) was good but Paracosm is absolutely great. I feel like the sound is much more his own, versus the production on Within and Without. It’s as if he got back to his roots, and I love it. He also has a legit live band (I saw them in Boulder in September) that combines elements of electronic synth-pop with real instruments and lots of vocals. It was a big step forward from earlier iterations of the performance. I hope the Washed Out albums keep on coming.

3.  Phoenix – Bankrupt.  I’m a big Phoenix fan. I loved their last album, and in many ways this record is an extension of that sound. It’s all very consistent–pop hooks framed by really creative production. When Bankrupt dropped I couldn’t turn it off, and that’s the sign of a great album. There’s some conceptual stuff in there, and just a bunch of catchy songs. They also included a cool mashup of ‘sketches,’ entitled the Bankrupt Diaries, which looks at different early impressions of the music. You hear snippets of working versions which gives a cool glimpse into the evolution of the music for this album.

2.)  I went out of my way to see some great bands that I follow this past year, which always reminds me of how great true fandom feels. We lose touch with that feeling as professional musicians, but it’s so important and I’m more into it than ever. But far and away my most memorable musical moment this year was playing with John Scofield at The Festy Experience (our annual festival in central VA). Sco is my absolute improvising hero. His playing is just pure feeling, something I aspire to every time I get on stage–it’s the only thing the untrained ear really relates to and thus your greatest responsibility as a performer. It helps to be good, but it’s essential to be real, and Scofield is the best at both. He sat in with the Stringdusters for two songs, one of his, “Kelpers,” and one of ours, “Fire.”  We took a solo together, trading ideas and flowing with the music. Though the fan side of me was just freaking out, he was so cool through the whole experience that the music really came to life. I can never remember being more inspired on stage. Thank you John Scofield, you are a musical God.

3.)  I recently got into a great new album called Kittyhawk by Ki:Theory (aka Joel Burleson). He’s managed by a friend, and I’ve been aware of him for a while, but this album is just sick, a huge step forward in both writing and production. Ki:Theory doesn’t tour much, so the recording is kind of the thing. His early stuff was more vibey songwriter stuff, but the album is so thick with creative production, but not just for production’s sake. The sounds bring the music to life in just the right way, and they range all over the sonic map. It’s really impressive and great sounding–a big inspiration for me in my solo endeavors. I could see his music being much much more popular.

4.)  I’m looking forward to working on my solo stuff this coming year (TradPlus). The Stringdusters is such a dream come true musical outlet, but it’s also all about the art of compromise. I’ve been into lots of different sounds/styles for a long time and I’m finally gearing up to release some music and perform solo. The concept has evolved a lot over the past few years as I have learned the world of programming, worked on playing new instruments and discovered new influences. This is my vision, and I don’t have to compromise anything–it’s daunting but also totally liberating. I work a lot in my home studio, which is tailored pretty specifically for producing my own stuff–lots of software, VSTs, but also lots of instruments. It’s about new and different sonic textures, but it’s mostly about songs.

 

 

robert-walterRobert Walter – Robert Walter’s 20th Congress,  The Greyboy Allstars

1.)  It’s a little embarrassing, but I don’t really know very much about albums from 2013.  Mostly I’ve been listening to old records.  Lots of Prince and The Time lately, also Cymande and Black Sabbath.  I got a cassette player and have been enjoying shopping at the thrift store for tapes.

2.)  Greyboy Allstars late night at High Sierra Music Festival was one of my favorite gigs this year.  We also did three nights this summer in NYC with Houston Person, James Carter and Gary Bartz, one each night.  It was fun to play with those guys and hear them up close. Very inspiring.

3.)  I love The Mike Dillon Band.

4.)  More touring, writing and recording.  I enjoy making music.

 

 

Tom-Hamilton-3Tom Hamilton – American Babies

1.) 1.  Arcade Fire – Reflektor.  These guys are batting 1000 when it comes to making records. With a sound that is unique and always evolving. I look forward to their releases with the same excitement that I have for Radiohead albums.

2.  Laura Marling – Once I Was An Eagle.  Don’t sleep on this. She is part Nick Drake, part Leonard Cohen, and all woman. Her songs are devastating, her voice like a ghost in a dream.

3.  Atoms For Peace – Amok.  Four words: Thom Yorke and Flea.

2.)  I did a show in January with a bunch of my friends called “Joe Russo’s Almost Dead.” It was one of those nights that you never forget. We all clicked right from the first note.

3.)  Laura Marling. She’s is an absolute delight.

4.)  Touring the country a couple times over with American Babies. We’re coming for ya…

(Read our recent interview with Tom Hamilton on the making of his latest album, Knives & Teeth. Tom Hamilton & American Babies get their Knives and Teeth out)

 

 

JenningsJennings Carney – Pontiak

1.)  1.  Portal Vexovoid because it is super interesting and textured.

2. Cass McCombs Big Wheel and Others because it just is.
3. Rediscovered “Dreaming My Dreams”, by Waylon Jennings.

2.)  We played Hopscotch festival in Raleigh and participated in Seth Olinsky’s Band Dialogue. It was awesome. A bunch of bands set up in a closed off street and played one long big droning piece of music.

3.)  I don’t know.

4.)  Going on tour in the US and Europe in support of our new album.  Making more music videos with remote controlled apparatus.

 

 

GC-PR JPEG color _1Carol Young – The Greencards

1.)  1.  Paul Kelly – Spring and Fall.  Honest songwriting. Paul is in a class of his own.

2. Sarah Jarosz – Build Me Up From Bones.  Sarah’s an outstanding musician and songwriter. Sonically this album is on a whole other level.

3. Mark Knopfler – Privateering. Has two of the best songs I’ve heard all year, “Seattle” and “Redbud Tree”.

2.)  Paul Kelly at The Mercy Lounge during the Americana Conference, Nashville TN, Sept 2013.

3.)  Austin band, Sons of Fathers.

4.)  Heading back to Australia to play CMC Rocks The Hunter Festival in March 2014.  It’s going to be great to take our new album home.

 

 

Brian HaasBrian Haas – Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey

1.) 1. Samuel Jackson Five – Samuel Jackson Five

2. Fuck Buttons – Slow Focus

3. All Hail Bright Futures – And So I Watch You From Afar

Because I love new, unique, good, mostly instrumental rock and roll.

 2.)  My favorite live music moment was playing my new album Frames with Johnny Vidacovich at Snug Harbor in NOLA.

3.)  I was most excited to rediscover the Fuck Buttons, awesome album.

4.)  I am looking forward to Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey’s 20th Anniversary Tour !

 

 

Garrett7Garrett Anderson

1.) 1. Ben Folds Five – Live.  So glad those three got back together for “The Sound of the Life of the Mind” in 2012.  This live release was icing on the cake, especially since I didn’t make it out to see them on tour.

2.  Jack Johnson – From Here to Now to You.  Music video footage made me a little jealous I wasn’t in Hawaii making albums.  I’m a huge Zach Gill (ALO) fan and am glad those two teamed up.  Jack’s music is simple, but when I let it, it amplifies how much I love my life and the wonderful people in it.

3.  Anders Osborne – Peace.  I’ve only recently been turned onto Anders and I’m so glad I did.  His music resonates with me in a deep dark beautiful place.  He’s became a huge musical inspiration for me bridging the singer-songwriter and jamband worlds.  I’m still getting into the nitty-gritty of Peace, but a few casual listens and it sounds to me like he’s on top of his game.

2.)  Can I pick one of each? Being 2nd row Paige-side for Phish in Reading, PA for a great 2nd set (thanks Marc).  We were so close that the camera guy would intermittently block our view of Trey to get footage of guitar solos.  For me, I finally got to visit my wife’s family in Texas this year.  At my next gig back home, I sang a lyric of mine “we’ve yet to cross off visiting Texas” and got a huge smile on my face because we finally did cross it off the list.  What used to be a bittersweet lyric evolved into a reminder of a great family trip.

3.)  Snarky Puppy – I noticed some social-media buzz for their show in Baltimore so I checked them out online and was hooked.  They nurture music to get the maximum smoothness and groove out of each tune.  I wish I had the focus and chops to compose like them.  Just cool, quality, wonderfully executed stuff.

4.)  Seeing Umphreys McGee in town for my 30th birthday – you gotta get old but you don’t haveta grow up.  Also, my bassist buddy Paul has a nice home-studio and I’m excited to hunker down and work on new recordings with him.

 

 

seth walkerSeth Walker

1.)  1.  Wood Brothers – The Muse.  Creative, soulful, uncluttered music. it takes me back to the old Band recordings with a brand new/old thang slung from their hip.

2.  Tedeschi/Trucks Band – Made Up Mind.  Good songs and great tones performed by actual musicians.

3.  Justin Timberlake – 20/20.  “Pusher Love Girl” is a bad ass soul pop production.

2.)  Performing with Allen Toussaint in NYC and playing at Magnolia Festival Ampitheater to an amazing listening/dancing music loving crowd.

3.)  I discovered Rodriguez. The Sugar Man soundtrack. So damn hip and a great story!

4.)  Releasing my new album produced by Oliver Wood.

 

 

HowlingBros-ParkingLot-ByJoshuaBlackWilkinsIan Craft – Howlin’ Brothers

1.)  1.  Doc & Merle Watson – Down South

2.  John Hartford, Tony Rice and Vassar Clements – Hartford Rice & Clements

3.  Sanctified Grumblers – No Lie

2.)  Playing the banjo concert on The Shady Grove Stage at The Winnipeg Folk Festival in July.
Brother Jared Green joined me for some shuffle drum set adventures.  It was very silly and
fun.  Can’t beat that!

3.)  outta Chicago.  They feel good to my soul.

4.)  Being a troubadour.

 

 

KennyRobyKenny Roby

1.)  1.  The National – Trouble Will Find Me.  I really like the National. They strike that dark nerve in me. They let me know everything might not be alright. Like a good Cormac McCarthy novel.

2.  Charles Bradley – Victim of Love.  Like with Ted Hawkins, its hard to separate the story from the songs. But both of them are the real deal. Putting their stories out there blood, piss and all.

3.  Chance The Rapper.  I guess he really hasn’t made an official record this year? Just mix tapes. But my son turned me onto him and he is one of the better MCs out their in my opinion. Really dig his style.

Honorable Mentions: Nick Cave, Ron Sexsmith, Paul McCartney (these are all good records but I haven’t truly sunk my teeth into them yet). These guys are so good though that it is like saying “which teams will do well this year…. besides the Yankees and Red Sox. ‘

And last I have to mention Snoop Lion. That movie and record are the most strange and in some ways “Rock ‘n’ Roll” releases in 2013. You almost can’t describe how weird the whole thing is. I love it.

2.)  Someone yelling “Seth Rogan” at me in front of a 1500 people opening for Citizen Cope. Us overweight curly haired guys gotta stick together.

3.)  Charles Bradley

4.)  Recording new songs with my old pals from Six String Drag in January. I have no idea what we will call it. It doesn’t matter. For now I am just going to bring in some songs and we’ll bang them out and see what happens on the tape machine. Also I plan on playing more shows in 2014 than I did in 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keller Williams with More Than A Little, It’s Funk

DSCN1498edited Keller Williams has released a new album, recorded live over several nights and billed as Keller Williams with More Than a Little (MTAL). Sticking with his monosyllabic motif, the album is called Funk. Honest Tune had a chance to chat with Keller about this album and the band behind it. He was home in Virginia, on a rare day off, and the excitement about the new project was evident in his voice.

 

In the past, when Keller has created a band, it has consisted of players that Keller fans already knew well. Not this time. Keller picked up a band of local Virginia players who spend more time playing churches than bars. The album is called Funk, but it is full of gospel, soul, disco, and R&B elements. It consists of ten songs, six of them covers, ranging from Rick James to the Grateful Dead, from Talking Heads to Flight of the Conchords.

 

More Than a Little consists of Keller on vocals and electric guitar, EJ Shaw on bass, Gerard Johnson on keys, Toby Fairchild on drums, and vocals from Tonya Lazenby Jackson and Sugah Davis.

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When speaking about the origins of MTAL, Keller expressed a deep sense of awe. “I think it’s a natural progression, going into deeper, soulful R&B, gospel type of funk. I mean this is not your ordinary group of guys trying to play funk music. These folks have allowed me into their world, man. I think these folks feel the funk and they understand the soulful R&B formula that has been foreign to me until now. Teaching them these songs and having them teach them back to me, it’s been a real, super inspiring experience and it continues to be.”

 

The name of the band is also the name of one of the originals on the album. Keller says this name came from the feelings he got the first time he played with this group. He was more than a little happy, more than a little inspired. And of course, the group is “more than a little funky.”

 

Keller was connected with this group of musicians through Fairchild, who played drums as a part of The Added Bonus, one of Keller’s New Year’s Eve run bands from the past couple of years. While his sense of amazement came through for the entire band, it was particularly prevalent when speaking about the awesome powers of Johnson. “If you ever listen to an African-American sermon – you know with the people cheering them on and there’s organ in the background – that’s Gerard. His ears are constantly open, he’s following everything. He’s an auditory genius.”

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 Keller’s brand is built on his one-of-a-kind, one-man looping show. When he is alone, he can go anywhere on a moment’s notice. He can change songs, switch tempos, drop out and start over; there are no rules. That is a special kind of freedom. But a band brings with it many advantages as well. Keller reflected on that freedom versus those constraints that playing with a band provides:

 “Oh my god. That’s the thing with these people. I can’t say enough how they allow me to be in their world, you know? There’s a certain kind of freedom playing solo where you can go anywhere at any time and that’s not always the case with a band. Except for this band. This band is so used to following different energies, whether it be a preacher or some kind of R&B thing. In R&B, at any time, the lead singer can say ‘break it down’ and then go into some kind of story. You know, it’s like, it’s almost as free as playing solo, playing with these folks, because they’re so in tune with what I’m doing, they’ll follow me anywhere and slip right in as if we rehearsed. There’s a certain element of improv that I didn’t expect going into this project, you know, is really unbelievable.”

 

 

When asked if his band with their gospel background have started calling him Reverend, Keller deadpans, “They call me a lot of things,” but Reverend is not one of them. But that does seem to be the role that he is playing in this band. He is the man in front, leading his people through their rites while his band follows him seamlessly from place to place. Close your eyes and you can almost see Keller running back and forth on stage, wireless mic strapped on, serving as the leader of less an audience than a congregation.

 

The album opens with a cover of the Flight of the Conchords, “I Told You I Was Freaky.”  Keller admits that the band was not DSCN1499editedfamiliar with that song or anything the Flight of ther Conchords has done.  In fact, he still doesn’t think they have ever heard the original. But they certainly bring their own unique approach to the song and it brings out a funk sensibility to the song that is certainly less prevalent in the original. Keller also admits the band had never played Grateful Dead songs before; this too was new to them. But you would never know it listening to their funked-up version of “West L.A. Fade Away.”

 

One of the most underrated, but most powerful parts of Keller’s new band his the strength of singers, Tonya Lazenby and Sugah Davis.  Since this band first started, Keller says his upfront singers have been “getting some love from other bands too and that’s really exciting.” And he likes to make clear that he does not see Lazenby and Davis as background singers, rather as upfront singers.  He feels their contributions and what they add to each song makes them more than just simple back-up singers. He compares what they do to the deep, powerful harmonies he heard in later day versions of the Jerry Garcia Band by vocalists Jaclyn Branch and Gloria Jones.

 

The band moves effortlessly from Talking Heads “Once in a Lifetime,” to Donna Summer’s “I Feel Love” to Rick James’ “Mary Jane.” The latter is the only track on the album on which Keller is not singing lead, showcasing his upfront singers. These songs all come from very disparate traditions, but Keller and MTAL make them all work within one solid sound. The album closes with a mash-up entitled “Samson’s Wine,” which moves back and forth between “Wine,” by Danny Barnes and “Samson and Delilah.”  It’s a song that fits perfectly with the gospel-flavored tinge of the album. While most people associate “Samson and Delilah” with The Grateful Dead, Bob Weir initially learned the song from the Reverend Gary Davis (though Davis was not an actual Reverend he was very spiritual).

 

When asked what music he has been listening to lately Keller said he has been very excited about a band called Breastfist, that he says is, “a mix of Ween meets, super-funk, it’s like Ween, Zappa but with a real strong sense of groove and funk.”  He has been particular enamored with their song “Talk to the Fist.”  Given Keller’s always wandering musical-muse perhaps one day in the near future or even at his up-coming always raging New Year’s Eve bash you can hear Keller include the song his set and sing, “Momma’s got nothing but love/she’ll fuck you up if push comes to shove.”

 

Follow Josh Klemons  on Twitter @jlemonsk

Greensky Bluegrass winter/spring tour dates

GSBGRoad-warriors Greensky Bluegrass have announced srping tour dates, as well the first glimpse of some of the festivals they will be playing through out the summer.  February and March will find the band in the Mid-West and West, while April finds the band kicking things off at the Highline Ballroom in New York City before hitting up the East Coast the rest of the month.

The band have also announced a trio of Festivals they will be at this summer, Dark Star Jubliee in May, Electric Forest in June, and the Northwest String Summit in July.

Greensky Bluegrass was in the studio last month finishing up the recording of their follow album to 2011’s Handguns.

 

Winter Tour Dates

2/8-9 – Kalamazoo, MI – Bell’s Eccentric Cafe

2/19- Chicago, IL – City Winery *

2/20 – Madison, WI – Majestic Theatre *

2/21 – Davenport, IA – Redstone Room *

2/22 – Des Moines, IA – Wooly’s *

2/23 – Lincoln, NE – Bourbon Theater *

2/26 – Carbondale, CO -PAC 3

2/28 – Ft. Collins, CO -Aggie Theatre #

3/1&2 – Boulder, CO – Fox Theatre #

3/3 – Salt Lake City, UT – State Room #

3/5 – Missoula, MT – Badlander #

3/6 – Spokane, WA – Knitting Factory #

3/7 – Bellingham, WA – Wild Buffalo #

3/8 – Seattle, WA – Neptune Theater #

3/9 – Portland, OR – Wonder Ballroom #

3/12 – Arcata, CA – Humboldt Brews #

3/13 – Chico, CA – El Rey Theatre # %

3/14 – Lake Tahoe, NV – Crystal Bay Club #

3/15 – San Francisco, CA – The Fillmore #

3/16 – Los Angeles, CA – The Troubadour #

3/17 – San Diego, CA – Porter’s Pub at UCSD #

 

Spring Tour Dates

4/17 – New York, NY – Highline Ballroom

4/18 – Philadelphia, PA – The Blockley

4/19 – Baltimore, MD – SoundStage

4/20 – Boston, MA – Middle East (Downstairs)

4/21 – Portland, ME – Port City Music Hall

4/23 – Burlington, VT – Higher Ground

4/24 – Syracuse, NY – Westcott Theater

4/25 – Pittsburgh, PA – Rex Theater

4/26 – Charlotte, NC – Visuilte Theater

4/27 – Moultrie, GA – Dogwood Music & Arts Festival

4/28 – New Orleans, LA – The Parish at House of Blues

4/30 – Birmingham, AL – WorkPlay

5/1 – Jackson, MS – Duling Hall

5/2 – Memphis, TN – 1884 Lounge at Minglewood Hall

5/3 – St. Louis, MO – 2720 Cherokee

5/4 – Bloomington, IL – Castle Theatre

5/24 Thornville, OH – Dark Star Jubilee

6/27-30 – Rothbury, MI – Electric Forest

7/27 – North Plains, OR – Northwest String Summit

 

* = The Deadly Gentlemen support

# = Ryan Montbleau Band support

% = special guest Sam Bush

http://greenskybluegrass.com/

Cris Jacobs & the Band of Johns fires up the hometown

Cris Jacobs & the Band of Johns

8×10

Baltimore, MD

February 2, 2013

 

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Since The Bridge called it quits just over a year ago, singer-guitarist Cris Jacobs has shown no signs of slowing down as he is a man constantly on the move exploring as much musical ground as he can cover, whether with his new project The Cris Jacobs Band (who released their debut album last year), as part of his long-time bluegrass band Smooth Kentucky, in the various guest spots and sit-ins he appears in with everyone from Anders Osborne to Los Lobos, or in his recent recording session with New Orleans legend Ivan Neville. On a night when his hometown of Baltimore was teeming with excitement in anticipation of the Ravens appearance in the Super Bowl the following day, Jacobs debuted his latest endeavor, The Band of Johns, at his home away from home, The 8×10.

 
Comprised of keyboardist John Ginty (John Ginty Band, Santana, Robert Randolph & the Family Band),drummer John Thomakos (John Mooney, Vanessa Carlton), and bassist Jake Leckie (Cris Jacobs Band) the quartet played together for the first time ever on this evening. With the city already _MG_5284brimming with energy and enthusiasm for the Ravens upcoming Super Bowl appearance, Jacobs show at the 8×10 took on the air of an almost surreal pep-rally at times, with many in the crowd decked out in purple or Ravens jerseys, including both Jacobs in a Ray Lewis jersey and Thomakos in an Ed Reed jersey. Jacobs made numerous references throughout the night to the game, and the inclusion of a couple ofr New Orleans themed covers in “Down South of New Orleans” and “Going Down to New Orleans” only served as another sly reference to the next day’s big game down in the Big Easy. But the most obvious Super Bowl reference came as the band was deep in the midst of a particularly adventurous journey through Jacobs’ old band The Bridge’s long-time live staple “Bad Locomotive.” As the song evolved into a dark swirling jam, the unmistakable driving bass and drum rhythm of the White Stripes “Seven Nation Army” began to show, slowly poking its face out from underneath the familiar chords of “Bad Locomotive.” The song has become the unofficial song/ chant of the Baltimore Ravens and their faithful during this past season, with the acapella chanting of its relentlessly, driving melody _MG_5312becoming omnipresent at Ravens games and seemingly every Super Bowl broadcast from New Orleans. This simple jam evoked the same response from the fans packed into the 8×10 who responded with a stadium worthy rendition of the chant, before the band broke it off and led back into “Bad Locomotive.”

 

But this night was not all about the Ravens and the upcoming Super Bowl, though that was definitely a big part of it. The evenings setlist drew heavily from Jacobs large repertoire of material, using the new material that Jacobs has written recently for The Cris Jacobs Band (including “Dragonfly,” “Devil or Jesse James,” and “Stoned on you”), a smattering of old Bridge songs (“Heavy Water,”, “Honeybee,” and “Devil on Me” among others), and a few tasty covers (the aforementioned New Orleans tunes and “You Can Stay but the Noise Must Go”) _MG_5313thrown in for good measure. This highly experienced band made this wide range music all their own. Jacobs’ soulful wail echoes the southern-fried, gravely, timbre of Lowell George, and the addition of the masterful touch of Ginty and the hard-driving, precise drumming of Thomakos seemed to give his voice that much more power on the evening (or maybe it was just the excitement for the Ravens). For many in the crowd in the crowd there was an extreme familiarity with many of Jacobs’ songs, but with addition of such seasoned skillful players as Ginty and Thomakos the music found new and interesting musical paths down which to wind.

 

Still the overriding theme for the show on this chilly night in Baltimore was the energy that came with the anticipation of The Ravens appearance in the Super Bowl the next day, and the night would appropriately end on that note. After wrapping up their set with a spirited take on The Bridge’s “Colorado Motel,” the crowd began shouting their approval and even more boisterous version of the “Seven Nation Army” chant erupted from the crowd as they waited for the band to retake the stage. The band quickly retook the stage. Leckie and Thomakos began to play along with the crowd, churning out the hard-hitting, pulsating rhythm of “Seven Nation Army,” only this time instead a brief tease, Jacobs and Ginty picked up the rhythm and launched into a full-on version of the song that burned with a ferocity that would make the hometown team’s long revered defense proud, and as everyone in the crowd gave their full-throated best to make their chant heard, all eyes turned towards New Orleans and next day’s Super Bowl._MG_5356

 

 

 

Author’s note – The Ravens would go on to win the Super Bowl the next day, the “Seven Nation Army” chant could be heard constantly throughout the game, Baltimore rejoiced, and for just one small moment there was peace in the world.

 

To see all of Jordan August ‘s photos from Jacobs’ surreal pep-rally please visit here.

10 of 2012: Team Honest Tune’s Top 10 Albums of the Year

Top 10 - HeaderIt is hard to believe that 2012 is coming to a close in a matter of days, but it has been an impressive year of releases from across the musical spectrum. Members of the Drive-By Truckers stepped out on their own, Dr. John re-emerged with a little help from a Black Key, and Alabama Shakes took the airways by storm with their debut, Boys and Girls.
And this is only the tip of a mountain of monumental music.

The members of Team Honest Tune have taken some time and put together their personal top album lists. The lists are as varied as the personalities we have on staff here, from rock to bluegrass to metal. Spend a little time with our lists, check out any albums that you haven’t heard, and be prepared to enjoy some fine, fine music.

 

Tom Speed – Editor in Chief/Publisherdr-john-locked-down

  1. Dr. John: Locked Down – Full of funky gris-gris and retro soul, Dr. John proves on this collaboration with The Black Keys’ Dan Auerbach that even in his 70s, he is still the king of Voodoo.
  2. Jack White: Blunderbuss – The first album in White’s already extensive oeuvre to actually be credited to him as a solo artist, Blunderbuss is a wide-ranging display of his rock bombast craftsmanship and his appreciation for moving American music forward.
  3. Tame Impala: Lonerism – This lush slice of pastoral psychedelia is both a blast to the past and an entrancing excursion into modern day sunshine pop.
  4. Jerry Joseph & The Jackmormons: Happy Book – There’s nary a clunker on this double-disc collection that feels like the culmination of Joseph’s decades long career as a prolific songwriter, a collection that is all the more glorious for harnessing the unique maelstrom that occurs when his songs are expressed through the Jackmormons.
  5. Alabama Shakes: Girls & Boys – One of the most buzzed about bands of the year shows why on this stunning, soulful debut.
  6. Hurray For The Riff Raff: Look Out Mama Look Out Mama is a gorgeous, timeless work of wonder. Alynda Lee Segarra and company deftly mingle Americana sounds from all over the map; dust-bowl ballads, old-timey string bands and folk blues all play prominently, all the while hearkening to times gone by.
  7. Jimbo Mathus: Blue Light – In just six songs, the Mississippi maestro cooks up a cauldron of blues, R&B, soul and country that celebrates rock-and-roll at the molecular level.
  8. Dent May: Do Things – Ditching the ukulele and instead delving into synth grooves, dance-floor shenanigans and Pet Sounds pop, May produced the summer’s most summery release.
  9. Howlin Rain: The Russian WildsHard rock ain’t dead. It’s alive and well on this expansive, scorching ’70s flashback of crunchy, lighter-waving rockers, replete with feedback, some horns and songs about werewolves.
  10. The Lumineeers : Self-Titled While Mumford & Sons, the Avett Brothers, and other stalwarts of the so-called roots revival movement may have garnered more mainstream buzz, the best record of the genre came from this Colorado-based trio and their self-titled debut, a record infused with vocals both plaintive and rousing and an infectious energy that elevate a prodigious selection of original songs to great heights.

 

Josh Mintz – Managing EditorTedeschi_Trucks_Talkin

  1. Tedeschi Trucks Band: Everybody’s Talkin’ – It’s almost unfair to put a live album as number one, but this album is so good it warrants it. It shows the Tedeschi Trucks Band where they should be – onstage, absolutely tearing through their catalog with reckless abandon. From Trucks to Tedeschi to the brothers Burbridge, the album gives all of the players a chance to shine.
  2. Avett Brothers: The Once and Future Carpenter – The Avett Brothers have matured into one of the best bands on the planet, and The Once and Future Carpenter is another large leap forward.
  3. Chris Robinson Brotherhood: Big Moon Ritual – It’s spacey in all the right places, and groovy in every way, just as psychedelic music should be.
  4. Howlin’ Rain: The Russian Wilds – Another phenomenal offering from one of the best little-known rock bands on the planet.
  5. Alabama Shakes: Boys and Girls – There’s something magically raw about this debut release. It’ll be tough to follow up.

 

Jamie Lee – CD/DVD Reviews EditorPatterson_Hood_Heat_Lightning

  1. Patterson Hood : Heat Lightning Rumbles in the Distance – Drive-By Trucker Patterson Hood delivers on his third – and best – solo album. It is vivid, gritty, and full of feeling.
  2. Neurosis : Honor Found in Decay – To say that Neurosis are in the zone would be an understatement. This album sounds as if the instruments are playing the musicians, and they don’t let up.
  3. Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit : Live from Alabama – Jason Isbell continues to cement his reputation as one of the era’s premier songwriters, and he proves on Live from Alabama that he can not only write, but he can perform.
  4. Baroness : Yellow & Green – Baroness reinvented themselves on Yellow & Green with succinct, rocking songs that lack the progressive leanings of previous releases, but make up for them with pure, concise power.
  5. Howlin’ Rain : The Russian Wilds – Howlin’ Rain can’t help but nod to ‘70s-era rock, and they do so with warmth, muscle, and a freshness that is rare.
  6. Glossary : Long Live All of Us – Glossary continue to churn out soulful songs that showcase Joey Kneiser’s songwriting and infectious harmonies he shares with wife Kelly. Long Live All of Us may have flown beneath the radar of the mainstream, but that in no way indicates the impact of this album.
  7. Isis : Temporal – Two years after calling it quits, Isis return with a  collection of rarities that hits all of the right spots. The sonic mastery of this band is to be reckoned with, even on stripped down demos found here.
  8. Stew & the Negro Problem : Making It – Brimming with polished compositions and clever wordplay, Making It is a cinematic collection by Stew and cohort Heidi Rodewald.
  9. Royal Thunder : CVI – Atlanta’s Royal Thunder followed up a solid 2010 eponymous EP with CVI, a debut that is Sabbath-thick and heaving. At the forefront are the breathtaking vocals of powerhouse Mlny Parsons.
  10. Mike Cooley : The Fool On Every Corner – On his first solo album, Mike Cooley is captured live, acoustic, and rummaging through covers and songs from his Drive-By Truckers catalog. With banter that is engaging as the music is spirited, this album clearly articulates his stellar songwriting prowess.

 

Tim Newby – Features Editor Dr. Dog  - Be The Void

  1. Dr. Dog : Be The Void – Dr. Dog have been on a hot streak of late, from Fate to Shame, Shame to their latest album, Be the Void.  This is classic Dr. Dog, full of quirky songs that wear their Beatles, the Band, and Neil Young influences on their sleeve. They are loud and proud, sounding like they were written for drunken campfire sing-alongs.  That is a good thing … a really good thing.
  2. Justin Townes Earle : Nothing’s Going to Change the Way You Feel About Me Now –When you are the son of Steve Earle and named after Townes Van Zandt, you have some big shoes to fill. On Nothing’s Going to Change the Way You Feel About Me, Earle proves just how big his feet really are as he crafts a songwriter’s masterpiece resplendent with horns, Nashville soul, and a lyrically open frankness that is at times a troubling, personal narrative of the demons he struggles with.
  3. Jack White : Blunderbuss – Jack White has been on tear, and everything he touches seems to turn to gold, from the White Stripes to the Raconteurs to The Dead Weather, and now with his first solo album.  Despite the strength and greatness of all his various projects, heading out on his own has freed White up to go where he pleases with little concern.
  4. Alabama Shakes : Boys & Girls – Refreshingly retro with their rock-and-soul sound, Alabama Shakes follow up last year’s massive hype with Boys & Girls, their full-length debut, and they do not disappoint.  All throaty-howl and swampy-grooving guitar, the Shakes make music that, while clearly reminiscent of classic-rock-long-gone, is also as equally forward looking with a hint of punk’s unbridled fury and indie-guitar’s angst.  Music like this makes it fun to get up each morning.
  5. Cloud Nothings : Attack on Memory – It’s easy to try and peg Attack on Memory as a ’90s nostalgia trip, with sludgy guitars, Pixies- Nirvana soft/loud dynamic, and Steve Albini manning the production duties. However, the nine-minute second track, “Wasted Days,” quickly blows that theory out of the water, as it more closely resembles Television’s guitar-freak-out-jam “Marquee Moon.”  That is the genius of Attack on Memory, the way it subtly hints at past greatness, but creates its own unique path.
  6. Punch Brothers : Who’s Feeling Young Now – While rooted in bluegrass, the Chris Thiele-led Punch Brothers explode across the musical universe with their hyperactive kid approach that finds them taking choices coaxing unimaginable sounds from their simple acoustic instruments.  It is space-age bluegrass.  For proof of their otherworldly creativity one only need to listen to their mind-blowing cover of Radiohead’s “Kid A.”
  7. Grizzly Bear – Shields – Shields is not an easy album to get to know. It is deep, dark, and complex, requiring multiple listens to truly absorb all its beauty.  It is not an album that lends itself to loud parties or drinking with friends, but rather one that unfolds over time, revealing itself slowly, before rewarding the patience of the listener with a gorgeous aural trip.
  8. Anders Osborne – Black Eye Galaxy Black Eye Galaxy is a well-developed song-cycle with Osborne leading the listener on a brutally honest, painful journey from his past demons into his future.  It is an open book to a man’s soul, a painful reminder of how flawed we can all be, but told with a touch of unflinching beauty and thunderous guitar.
  9. Cris Jacobs – Songs for Cats & Dogs – After a decade spent as the driving force behind The Bridge, Jacobs has stepped out on his own and released his solo debut-album, Songs for Cats & Dogs. With his storyteller’s eye, passionate guitar, and fiery, expressive voice, he has created an album of deeply, powerful music which defies easy categorization.  It is an album that has an intoxicating, irresistible, rootsy groove that seems to explode from the past with its timeless quality.
  10. Beach House – Bloom – Bloom is all ambient glory and huge, undulating sonic-landscapes awash with singer Victoria Legrand’s ethereal voice filling the sky above.  Following up 2010’s masterful Teen Dream, Bloom expands on the ideas first presented there and finds the Baltimore duo infusing their songs with a hook-based approach that allows those dreamy, textured moments to explode.

Honorable Mention – Dr. John : Locked Down, Gary Clark Jr : Blak & Blu, Jimmy Cliff : Rebirth

 

Sarah Tollie – ContributorEd Sheeran_Debut

  1. Ed Sheeran : + – With his simply titled album +, Ed Sheeran has brought about a rebirth of the bare-boned, bare-souled songwriter in his native Britain—and this year, he’s made waves stateside. The Brit Award-winner is now Grammy-nominated with his lead single “The A Team.” Other memorable offerings from + include “Lego House,” “Small Bump,” “You Need Me, I Don’t Need You,” and “Give Me Love.”
  2. Annie & the Beekeepers : My Bonneville – Boston-based Annie & the Beekeepers have been festival-circuit darlings for several years, and that’s due in large part to two key things: 1) Annie Lynch’s stuck-to-your-bones vocals and 2) her group’s excellent knack for creating excellent albums. This year’s My Bonneville, with such gems as “An Island” and “Always My Heart is True,” is no exception.
  3. Mumford and Sons : Babel – With Babel, Marcus Mumford and company have crafted a second full-length set filled to the brim with sonic gems. It comes as no surprise, then, to hear of the band’s recent honors: From radio-ready and critic-friendly lead single “I Will Wait” to Grammy nominations to their highly successful Gentlemen of the Road tour, Mumford and Sons are riding high—and rightly so—on the strength of this set.
  4. Silbermond : Himmel Auf – Silbermond’s name might conjure up classical music thoughts, and its latest album title, confusion for non-German speakers, but this Teutonic band speaks volumes and breaks barriers with its music. With Himmel Auf (or roughly, “Sky open” in English), Silbermond connects with listeners on a deeper level: The disc  plays boldly, beautifully with ever-ethereal vocals from Stefanie Kloss and driving beats from members Andreas Nowak, Johannes Stolle, and Thomas Stolle.
  5. JD McPherson : Signs and Signifiers – JD McPherson serves up semiotics, soul, rock, and blues on his much-abuzz major label debut. Signs and Signifiers sets fire with tracks such as “North Side Gal” and the aptly-titled “Fire Bug.” Rolling Stone has caught McPherson’s flame, too, naming him an “Artist to Watch” in its November 19 issue.
  6. Ellie Goulding : Halcyon – Following the still-building buzz of her debut single “Lights,” British electro-pop songstress Ellie Goulding returned triumphantly this year with her sophomore effort, Halcyon. From the pulsing lead single “Anything Could Happen” to the emotive track “Only You,” Goulding’s whisper of a voice shouts and softens at all of the right moments.
  7. Hanson :  No Sleep for Banditos The Tulsa trio’s mini studio effort No Sleep for Banditos was released earlier this year as part of an exclusive fan club package. But, on the strength of this five-track set, one thing is clear: Hanson warrants a wider audience. The standout song is the EP’s fourth track, the rousing and rocking “Heartbreaker.”
  8. Shovels and Rope : O’ Be Joyful It’s possible that Shovels and Rope might have never happened: Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent had carved their own sonic paths with their own full-length efforts, Lions and Lambs and The Winner, respectively. Luckily, Hearst and Trent released their second effort, O’ Be Joyful, earlier this year. Key tracks on this funk and folk, country and rock set include “Birmingham” and “Tickin’ Bomb.”
  9. Gossip : A Joyful Noise – After a brief foray into the solo world, powerhouse front woman Beth Ditto fully returned to her band this year with Gossip’s fifth full-length set, A Joyful Noise. Following the delightful bop and pop, disco and dance of Music for Men, this album finds the worldly (by way of Arkansas) band breaking new sonic—and certainly, stuck-to-your-bones—ground. Catchy, dance-y keepers include the Madonna-esque lead single “A Perfect World” and “Love in a Foreign Place.”
  10. Alex Band : After the Storm – Former frontman of rock band The Calling, Alex Band is back with another brief, but haunting, set. After the Storm finds Band traversing the darker depths of childhood, love, and relationships. Set atop sweeping, mid-tempo beats, “Take Me Back,” “Right Now,” and “King of Anything” show Band at his best.

 

Brett Bickley – ContributorJerry_Joseph_Happy_Book

  1. Jerry Joseph & the Jackmormons : Happy Book – Yes, artists still release double albums. And this? It is the best rock album of 2012.
  2. Trixie Whitley : Fourth Corner – Forget Adele. Trixie is the most brilliant female artist performing and recording today.
  3. Mike Dillon : Urn – I don’t even know where to begin. But trust me, this guy is the real deal.
  4. Lettuce : Fly Fly is just one of the many reasons why Eric Krasno is one of the most amazing musicians recording today. Plus, you can dance all night to it.
  5. Medeski, Martin & Wood : Free Magic – This ain’t your father’s jazz. Intriguingly intricate, interesting, and damn fine.
  6. Wil Blades & Billy Martin : Shimmy How can two Caucasians sound this funky? Apparently, quite easily.
  7. Will Johnson : Scorpion – If My Morning Jacket love this guy, you can’t go wrong. You can feel the sand and tumbleweeds as you listen to this slice of desert Americana.
  8. Gaslight Anthem : Handwritten – Next to Bruce, the band that makes me proud to live in New Jersey.
  9. Chris Robinson Brotherhood : Big Moon Ritual/The Magic Door Forget Phish. This is the band that will replace The Grateful Dead.
  10. Swans : The Seer – The genius of Michael Gira returns to us in walls of emotion and noise. It is guaranteed to peel your soul open and lay it bare.

The Bridge & National Bohemian: Funky Little Moments

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Words by Tim Newby/ photos by Jordan August

“This sounds good. How can we fuck it up,” remembers Bridge guitarist Cris Jacobs being asked by legendary producer Steve Berlin during the recording of their latest album, National Bohemian, which was helmed by Berlin.

Jacobs’ longtime band mate, mandolinist Kenny Liner elaborates, “Steve’s whole attitude is you have heard everything before, so let’s try something you haven’t heard, and that is such an amazingly cool attitude to have as a band going in to record an album.”

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Caleb Stine – Music is Life

By: Tim Newby / Photos by: Tim Newby

047A glass of whiskey sat in front of me, directly next to it a typewriter with a blank sheet of paper loaded into the carriage.   Try it out, implored Baltimore singer/songwriter Caleb Stine.

The typewriter sat on the table in Stine’s kitchen and he had just finished telling me how, in a very Dylan-esque way, he likes to type out all of the lyrics to his songs. He explained, “When it is typed it is real, it is much easier to see what lines work in each song. It is like having a demo recording”.

Following his advice I began to type.  Despite the nonsensical sentences I put on the paper, the clacking of typewriter keys is a distinct sound, one long forgotten with the comparatively silent sound that emits from computer keyboards. And this intoxicating sound soon got me into the steady rhythm of writing.  While I was typing away, Stine grabbed his guitar and took the seat across the table from me.

When my typing slowed, he announced, “Here is the new one.”

 

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The Bridge: Singing Like the Early Morning Sun

By: Tim Newby

Photos By: Sam Friedman

 

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“You have to baby pick it,” says producer Chris Bentley.

“I thought I was,” the voice of Kenny Liner, mandolinst for the Bridge, comes over the speakers in the control room.  The frustration is clear in his voice.

 It is an unseasonably hot day in late March, but The Bridge – as they have most of the month – is holed up at the bottom of a non-descript white building located just outside the Baltimore City limits in Cockeysville, Maryland.  The building houses Bunker Recording Studio, the band’s studio of choice and where they have recorded all of their previous albums and are currently working on their new album, Blind Man’s Hill, due out October 21.

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