Category Archives: Departments

10 Questions with…Olga

When the traditional sounds of West African percussion and drumming get together to hang out with the familiar sound of good ole’ American rock’n’roll, they will invariably be with Asheville, NC’s Toubab Krewe.

 

Toubab Krewe burst onto the music just over a year and half ago and in that time they have brought an entirely new and invigorating sound to our ears.  Made up of five longtime friends who shared a common passion for the drumming and percussive sounds of traditional West African music, the members of Toubab Krewe made numerous trips to Africa to study this musical style that interested them so deeply.  While there they studied under many of the genre’s masters, among them Lamine Soumano (who has joined the band for their current tour), soaking up the rich deep percussive sounds that emanate from that region of the world .  Combining the sounds they learned in Africa with the sounds they grew up with in America, Toubab Krewe have created a wholly new sound that is garnering new fans with each new show and festival they play.

 

Percussionist Luke Quaranta took time discuss these things and more with Honest Tune contributing writer Tim Newby .   

 

 

Honest Tune:  How did you guys meet and come together?

Luke Quaranta:  It is kind of a long story.  Toubab Krewe members grew up in Asheville, NC.  Three of our members actually grew up together.  Justin Perkins (kora, kamel-ngoni) and Drew Heller (guitar) have known each other since they were six.  Teal Brown (drums) met them at an early age and started playing music with them.  In 1997 Teal and I met at Warren Wilson College, and we shared an interest in West African music that started with the drumming tradition.  We found our bass player Dave Bransky, because his sister used to dance in our art group Common Ground, and that is how we met him for the first time.  He is a self-taught mandolinist and when this project came together in late 2004 he became the bass player.

 

Continue reading 10 Questions with…Olga

The Black Angels

The Black Angels

Austin , Texas

 

Austin, Texas’ the Black Angels launch rock and roll into a stratospheric new direction.  Utilizing walls of sonic sound, The Black Angels sound very much like a modern day The Doors (more so than The Doors of the 21st Century).  Alex Maas plays bass and leads the group on its’ psychedelic voyage with his eerie vocals.   Live, you never know who is playing bass or guitar as Maas, Christian Bland, Nate Ryan and Kyle Hunt all interchange instruments, taking on each. 

 

The constant on stage is Stephanie Bailey behind the kit.  She doesn’t change instruments, or intentions.  Throughout the whole album and during live performances, she rages behind the drum kit, pouring her all into the rhythm.  Bailey’s energy is only outdone by the massive swell of distorted guitars and thundering bass.  The colossal wall of guitar is accented by Jennifer Raines’ freaked out work on the drone machine.

 

Their recent release Passover may be one of the most shamefully overlooked albums of 2006.  Full of psychedelic rock and roll and artistic studio work, it captures the essence of a powerful band blurring the lines of the 60’s and today.

 

The Black Angels will be touring Europe this spring, but will surely make big waves this summer stateside during the festival season. 

 

Look for more on the band at www.theblackangels.com

10 Questions with: Alvin Youngblood Hart

When the traditional sounds of West African percussion and drumming get together to hang out with the familiar sound of good ole’ American rock’n’roll, they will invariably be with Asheville, NC’s Toubab Krewe.

 

Toubab Krewe burst onto the music just over a year and half ago and in that time they have brought an entirely new and invigorating sound to our ears.  Made up of five longtime friends who shared a common passion for the drumming and percussive sounds of traditional West African music, the members of Toubab Krewe made numerous trips to Africa to study this musical style that interested them so deeply.  While there they studied under many of the genre’s masters, among them Lamine Soumano (who has joined the band for their current tour), soaking up the rich deep percussive sounds that emanate from that region of the world .  Combining the sounds they learned in Africa with the sounds they grew up with in America, Toubab Krewe have created a wholly new sound that is garnering new fans with each new show and festival they play.

 

Percussionist Luke Quaranta took time discuss these things and more with Honest Tune contributing writer Tim Newby .   

 

 

Honest Tune:  How did you guys meet and come together?

Luke Quaranta:  It is kind of a long story.  Toubab Krewe members grew up in Asheville, NC.  Three of our members actually grew up together.  Justin Perkins (kora, kamel-ngoni) and Drew Heller (guitar) have known each other since they were six.  Teal Brown (drums) met them at an early age and started playing music with them.  In 1997 Teal and I met at Warren Wilson College, and we shared an interest in West African music that started with the drumming tradition.  We found our bass player Dave Bransky, because his sister used to dance in our art group Common Ground, and that is how we met him for the first time.  He is a self-taught mandolinist and when this project came together in late 2004 he became the bass player.

 

Continue reading 10 Questions with: Alvin Youngblood Hart

Checking In With Toubab Krewe

When the traditional sounds of West African percussion and drumming get together to hang out with the familiar sound of good ole’ American rock’n’roll, they will invariably be with Asheville, NC’s Toubab Krewe.

 

Toubab Krewe burst onto the music just over a year and half ago and in that time they have brought an entirely new and invigorating sound to our ears.  Made up of five longtime friends who shared a common passion for the drumming and percussive sounds of traditional West African music, the members of Toubab Krewe made numerous trips to Africa to study this musical style that interested them so deeply.  While there they studied under many of the genre’s masters, among them Lamine Soumano (who has joined the band for their current tour), soaking up the rich deep percussive sounds that emanate from that region of the world .  Combining the sounds they learned in Africa with the sounds they grew up with in America, Toubab Krewe have created a wholly new sound that is garnering new fans with each new show and festival they play.

 

Percussionist Luke Quaranta took time discuss these things and more with Honest Tune contributing writer Tim Newby .

 

 

Honest Tune:  How did you guys meet and come together?

Luke Quaranta:  It is kind of a long story.  Toubab Krewe members grew up in Asheville, NC.  Three of our members actually grew up together.  Justin Perkins (kora, kamel-ngoni) and Drew Heller (guitar) have known each other since they were six.  Teal Brown (drums) met them at an early age and started playing music with them.  In 1997 Teal and I met at Warren Wilson College, and we shared an interest in West African music that started with the drumming tradition.  We found our bass player Dave Bransky, because his sister used to dance in our art group Common Ground, and that is how we met him for the first time.  He is a self-taught mandolinist and when this project came together in late 2004 he became the bass player.

 

Continue reading Checking In With Toubab Krewe

10 Questions with…Tim Carbone

Inspiration is passed to us through the bloody sweat of nobodies and the quiet dignity of underground artists whose trials and tribulations allow them to grow and to understand themselves, and for those who remain stout upon their principles, to become one of those all important shards of porcelain, glass, or pebble.

 

As eras pass they will be studied via the few surviving tales that remain intact.  And while the mystery of life requires that a few pieces be missing to keep we troglodytes interested enough to hold our attention upon advancement, it is the shattered puzzle of mosaic stories that form our cultural icons. Icons raised by a collection of individuals and not those raised by the mobs at market are strong enough to test time’s degrading march, able to be passed down to the minds of the next generations.  Enter The New Riders of the Purple Sage, a band known by the shard-missing story of Grateful Dead coat-tailer.  But layers are still unfolding, because David Nelson and Buddy Cage linger upon the adventure.

Continue reading 10 Questions with…Tim Carbone

10 Questions with…Bobby Lee Rodgers

Inspiration is passed to us through the bloody sweat of nobodies and the quiet dignity of underground artists whose trials and tribulations allow them to grow and to understand themselves, and for those who remain stout upon their principles, to become one of those all important shards of porcelain, glass, or pebble.

 

As eras pass they will be studied via the few surviving tales that remain intact.  And while the mystery of life requires that a few pieces be missing to keep we troglodytes interested enough to hold our attention upon advancement, it is the shattered puzzle of mosaic stories that form our cultural icons. Icons raised by a collection of individuals and not those raised by the mobs at market are strong enough to test time’s degrading march, able to be passed down to the minds of the next generations.  Enter The New Riders of the Purple Sage, a band known by the shard-missing story of Grateful Dead coat-tailer.  But layers are still unfolding, because David Nelson and Buddy Cage linger upon the adventure.

Continue reading 10 Questions with…Bobby Lee Rodgers

10 Questions with…Jeff Miller

Inspiration is passed to us through the bloody sweat of nobodies and the quiet dignity of underground artists whose trials and tribulations allow them to grow and to understand themselves, and for those who remain stout upon their principles, to become one of those all important shards of porcelain, glass, or pebble.

 

As eras pass they will be studied via the few surviving tales that remain intact.  And while the mystery of life requires that a few pieces be missing to keep we troglodytes interested enough to hold our attention upon advancement, it is the shattered puzzle of mosaic stories that form our cultural icons. Icons raised by a collection of individuals and not those raised by the mobs at market are strong enough to test time’s degrading march, able to be passed down to the minds of the next generations.  Enter The New Riders of the Purple Sage, a band known by the shard-missing story of Grateful Dead coat-tailer.  But layers are still unfolding, because David Nelson and Buddy Cage linger upon the adventure.

Continue reading 10 Questions with…Jeff Miller

New Riders of the Purple Sage: Behind the Scene

Inspiration is passed to us through the bloody sweat of nobodies and the quiet dignity of underground artists whose trials and tribulations allow them to grow and to understand themselves, and for those who remain stout upon their principles, to become one of those all important shards of porcelain, glass, or pebble.

 

As eras pass they will be studied via the few surviving tales that remain intact.  And while the mystery of life requires that a few pieces be missing to keep we troglodytes interested enough to hold our attention upon advancement, it is the shattered puzzle of mosaic stories that form our cultural icons. Icons raised by a collection of individuals and not those raised by the mobs at market are strong enough to test time’s degrading march, able to be passed down to the minds of the next generations.  Enter The New Riders of the Purple Sage, a band known by the shard-missing story of Grateful Dead coat-tailer.  But layers are still unfolding, because David Nelson and Buddy Cage linger upon the adventure.

Continue reading New Riders of the Purple Sage: Behind the Scene